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“If you are insecure, guess what? The rest of the world is too. Do not overestimate the competition and underestimate yourself. You are better than you think.” — T. Harv Eker

11- What is your dream job?

Ideally, your response to the question should reference some elements of the job at hand. For example, if the position is a salesman job, you might say that your dream job would have a high level of interaction with customers. 

You can also focus on your ideal company culture and work environment. For instance, you might say you’re eager to work in a collaborative environment or to be a part of a passionate team. 

Another option is to frame your answer around the industry. For example, if you are applying for a job at an accounting company, you can mention your passion for numbers. 

12- When can you start?

The best way to answer is to be truthful and clear while providing the employer the earliest possible date that you could realistically and comfortably start the job.

If you’re currently employed, say you’re available to start after your notice period with your current employer ends. Never leave for a new position without giving your current employer proper notice.

If you’re unemployed, you still shouldn’t say you’re available to start the next day, just say you’d need one week to prepare yourself. Saying you’re able to start immediately implies that either this job is your first choice, or that your job search isn’t going very well. This can hurt your negotiating power if you receive a job offer.

After providing your answer, you can ask if that fits their timeline, and you can tell them that you’re willing to discuss and adjust based on their needs, for example, “I’m able to begin my next job two to three weeks after being offered a position. Does that fit with the timeframe you have in mind?”

13- Are you willing to relocate?

If the answer is yes, try focusing on what makes this role special to you and your attachment to its location or situation, you convince the interviewer that you’d fit right in, for example, “I’m really excited about this opportunity and feel I could provide great value in this role. I would definitely be open to relocation and look forward to learning more details around this.”

If you really want the job but struggle to commit to relocating, you have to figure out the best way to break that news to the interviewer without hurting your chances. You’ll need to express your conditions clearly before signing up for something you can’t follow through on later.

However, if you might be open to relocation but don’t love this job enough to move for it, it’s probably best you don’t get it and keep your options open for better opportunities in your area.

But if you actually really like the job but want (or need) a little leeway, consider taking the approach of learning yes, but with the caveat that if possible you’d like to stay where you are—or be compensated if you do move. This way, you set yourself up to discuss your options, should the hiring manager decide they like you enough to be flexible on relocation.

14- What do you like to do outside of work?

This is an interview question that can provide insight into how you’ll fit in with other members of the team; it can also provide insight into your personal priorities. Another purpose of this question, however, may be to gauge how you would react to the unexpected.

Don’t be tempted to fib and claim to enjoy hobbies you don’t. Focus on activities that indicate some sort of growth: skills you’re trying to learn, goals you’re trying to accomplish. Weave those in with personal details. For example, “Work and family accounts for a lot of my time. On the weekends, we like to get out to the beach or the park and enjoy nature. It’s a good way for us to reset before tackling the workweek, and a great way to get exercise. I also really like languages, so I’m using my commute time to learn German.”

15- What is your work style?

What interviewers are trying to understand is how well you’ll fit in with the current company culture. 

Keep your answer personal, humble, honest.

Give strict examples if you can but keep it brief. Take the qualities that you feel will make you stand out and put them into the answer instead. You can emphasize the qualities of your work that you appreciate as well.

There are a few traits that can be used to describe a person’s approach.

Cooperative workers do best when they are part of a group. They enjoy bouncing ideas off of others and incorporating feedback. Additionally, diplomacy and relationship-building are common skills for these professionals.

Independents tend to have a lot of self-discipline and may have strong research and problem-solving skills, allowing them to find their own answers when they encounter obstacles.

Another pairing is whether you consider yourself creative or logical. 

Creative types may be better equipped to find unique solutions to problems. They also tend to be thoughtful, highly emotionally aware, and very expressive.

A logical person may be more detail- or data-oriented. Strategic thinking could be a strength, as well as organization and planning.



WEEKLY VOCABULARY 🗣

Free time: time when you do not have to work, study, etc., and can do what you want.

Unexpected: not expected or regarded as likely to happen.

Difference: a point or way in which people or things are not the same.

Cooperative: involving mutual assistance in working toward a common goal.

Cautious: careful to avoid potential problems or dangers.


PHRASAL VERBS

Check somebody/something out

“The company checks out all new employees.”

Figure something out

“I am going to figure out this math problem.”

Find out

“Did you find out why Jason got fired?”

Pay for something

“People earning low wages will find it difficult to pay for childcare.”

Sort something out

“We need to sort the bills out before the first of the month.”


IDIOMS 📒

The blue-eyed boy: a person who can do nothing wrong.

Work all the hours that God sends: work as much as possible.

Get off on the wrong foot: start off badly with someone.

Beat around the bush: not say exactly what you want.

Get your feet under the table: get settled in.




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