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“A goal without a plan is just a wish.” — Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

 

Creating a study plan allows you to see how you spend your time and ensures that you set aside enough time outside of class to complete homework assignments, study for tests, and review and retain the information you are learning.

Before proceeding, I would like to emphasize that it’s essential to understand that there is no “right” way to make a study plan. Your study plan should be personalized based on your specific needs, classes, and learning style.

 

Let’s check 6 guidelines to get started on creating your study plan.

 

1- Analyze your current study habits and learning style 

Think about what works and what doesn’t work for you. Can you study for long blocks once or twice a week, or is it more effective if you study nightly for thirty minutes? Are you more productive at a certain time of day? Do you retain material better if you study a subject immediately after class, or do you need a break first?

 

2- Evaluate your current schedule and time management

Use a digital or paper calendar to block out your standing commitments, including classes, work, and extracurricular activities. This will let you see how much of your time is available for studying.

 

3- Plan how much time you need to study for each class

Your instructors will give you syllabi for the classes you take. The syllabi will usually include the dates of important exams or projects. You can use these as guides for calculating how much time to set aside for each class, as some courses might be more intensive. It will also help you schedule your study sessions to ensure you have time to complete assignments and prepare for exams.

 

4- Develop a schedule

Add your study sessions to your calendar like any other commitments. Plan out which subject you will study on which day to ensure that you devote enough time to each topic. For example, Mondays and Wednesdays can be set aside for science, while Tuesdays and Fridays can be dedicated to marketing.

 

5- Assess your weekly calendar

Identifying your learning goals for each class will help determine how much time you need to study. Think about what you want to accomplish in each class at the start of the term. 

Then, at the beginning of each week, determine why you need to study and what you plan to accomplish in each study session. Adjust your study plan to meet your weekly goals, and get the most out of each study session.

 

6- Stick to your schedule 

A study plan works best when followed consistently. Develop a study plan for the length of each term. You will have to adjust your plan when you switch your classes. The most important thing is sticking to your plan.

 

WEEKLY VOCABULARY 🗣

📌Commitment: an engagement or obligation that restricts freedom of action.

📌Premature: occurring or done before the usual or proper time; too early.

📌Sticking out: be highly noticeable.

📌Procrastinator: a person who habitually puts off doing things.

📌Diligent: caring and conscientiousness in one’s work or duties.

 

PHRASAL VERBS

📌Put off: postpone something.

Don’t put off what you can do today till tomorrow.

📌Act as something: to do a particular job, especially one that you do not usually do:

“He was asked to act as an adviser on the project.”

 

IDIOMS 📒

📌With one’s nose to the grindstone: to work very hard for a long time.

📌All work and no play: said to warn someone that they will not be an exciting person by working all the time.

 

Related Articles:

📌Creating a Personal Growth Planhttps://www.englishpriority.com/creating-a-personal-growth-plan/

📌How to avoid Procrastination https://www.englishpriority.com/how-to-avoid-procrastination/

📌Overcoming Imposter Syndrom https://www.englishpriority.com/overcoming-imposter-syndrome/



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